Spikenard - Organic EO

Nardostachys jatamansi (D.Don) DC.

(2)

Our certified organic Spikenard essential oil has a bitter-sweet, resinous, damp earth, mildly spicy aroma with woody green overtones. One of the oldest-known, rarest and most precious of oils, the roots and rhizomes for production of this oil are sustainably wild harvested

Size

Selected size SKU:934-016 - Spikenard - Organic 15 ml (1/2 oz) (w/ orifice reducer)

1 ml (1/30 oz)
$7.25
2 ml (1/15 oz)
$13.50
5 ml (1/6 oz)
$24.50
15 ml (1/2 oz)
$58.25
30 ml (1 oz)
$102.00
59.14 ml (2 oz)
$179.75
118.29 ml (4 oz)
$321.50
236.58 ml (8 oz)
$578.50
$7.25
Details
Solubility & Blending Suggestions
Suggested Resources
Safety Considerations
Certificates of Analysis (COA)
Documentation

Product Overview

Our certified organic Spikenard essential oil has a bitter-sweet, resinous, damp earth, mildly spicy aroma with woody green overtones. One of the oldest-known, rarest and most precious of oils, the roots and rhizomes for production of this oil are sustainably wild harvested in the mountains of Nepal by a conservation-oriented team specializing in endemic plants of the region.

Nardostachys jatamansi is a flowering plant from the same botanical family as Valerian, often found growing on north-facing rocky slopes at altitudes of about 3,000 to 5,000 m (9,800 to 16,400 ft) in the Eastern Himalayas of Nepal, Tibet, China and India.[1],[2]

Unfortunately, high demand combined with the difficulty in propagating slow-to-regenerate Spikenard rhizomes has led to overharvesting issues. Since 2017, restrictions on international trade have been enforced by CITES (the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora), including a ban on sales without proper permits. With CITES regulations in place to protect this vulnerable species and to limit potential damage to the surrounding ecosystem, restrictions on the harvest of Spikenard roots and rhizomes currently include: having defined collection areas that are alternated annually; prohibitions on hunting, over-collection, harvesting red-listed plants or those sourced near urban, industrial, agricultural or otherwise polluted areas.[1]

One of the most ancient of aromatics, Spikenard was considered precious to early Egyptian, Hebrew, and Hindu civilizations.[2] The Christian gospels describe Mary anointing Jesus’ feet with the (costly) ointment of Spikenard before the Last Supper, filling the house with its aroma.  It lends a deep and eloquent tone to natural perfumes, while its earthy, grounding aroma invokes an ambiance of calm, particularly in meditation and night time blends. With its sweeter and less pungent Valerian-like aroma, the heavy sesquiterpene molecules present in Spikenard make for excellent fixative properties. It is exquisite in anointing body oils and is also useful in targeted skincare preparations for mature and dry skin and scalp, foot lotions, and muscle and joint rubs.

1 Industry communication.

2 Mojay, Gabriel. Aromatherapy for Healing the Spirit, 1997, p.118.

3 Arctander, Steffen. Perfume and Flavor Materials of Natural Origin, 1960, p. 592.

4 Tisserand, Robert and Rodney Young. Essential Oil Safety, 2nd ed., 2014, p. 429.

Blends Well With

5.0

2 Reviews

100.0%
2
0.0%
0
0.0%
0
0.0%
0
0.0%
0

Customer Reviews

Lovely

Rating

Beautiful,grassy green,earthy and slightly floral. A lot like patchouli but more grassy like something between fresh cut grass and parsley. There is a sweetness that blends perfectly with lavender and is really nice with mastic leaf. The oil of my dreams. I might dilute it and wear it alone.

Review by Joel 3/26/2021

Green, Earthy Goodness

Rating

My first impression of this oil was that it smells just like Vetiver! It's got that same deep, dark, earthy wetness to it that brings to mind damp forests in the Pacific Northwest. When I compared it side-by-side with Vetiver, the differences became more apparent; Vetiver has a somewhat bitter, smoky quality to it, while Spikenard is much sweeter with more of a "green" quality, sort of like a cross between Patchouli and Vetiver. As such it's a natural complement to both of those oils, as well as any oils with a mossy or vegetal quality. Outstanding tenacity and strength, I'm looking forward to using this in a blend with Eucalyptus and Clary Sage to create a twist on the classic fougere structure.

Review by Daniel 3/3/2021

You need to be logged in to submit a review
logo

2024-06-14

Organic Rules and the Effect on Shipping Times

Recently, the rules around organic certification were enhanced to prevent fraudulent activity along the supply chain. This is a good thing, though lately you may have noticed...

logo

2024-06-10

How to Increase the Longevity of Natural Perfume

Natural perfumes can offer a beautiful botanical alternative to those typically seen in the mainstream beauty world, though natural aromatics aren’t known for their fragrance longevity. This is because conventional perfumes contain...

logo

2024-03-14

DIY Calendula Recipes

Calendula is a charming and vigorous garden plant with bright, toothy orange and yellow blooms. Its name comes from the root word for “calendar,” well-known for its robust ability to thrive...