Citronella - Organic EO

Cymbopogon winterianus Jowitt ex Bor

(0)

Our organic Citronella from India is distilled from a perennial grass, Cymbopogon winterianus – also known as the Java type – that is considered superior for use in perfumery because of its fresh, sweet,

Size

Selected size SKU:226-3 - Citronella - Organic Sample (1 ml)

Sample 3 grams (0.10 oz)
$ 2.00
$2.00
Details
Solubility & Blending Suggestions
Suggested Resources
Safety Considerations
Certificates of Analysis (COA)
Documentation

Product Overview

Our organic Citronella from India is distilled from a perennial grass, Cymbopogon winterianus – also known as the Java type – that is considered superior for use in perfumery because of its fresh, sweet, lemony aroma.[1] Cymbopogon nardus (known as the Ceylon type) is commonly used for aromatherapy applications for which it is well suited. This differentiation is due to the variance in their chemical compositions, mainly in their geraniol content (higher percent in the Ceylon type) and citronellal content (higher percent in the Java type)[2], and also accounts for the difference in their aromas.[3]

In the 19th century, a man named Winter (supposedly an important distiller in Ceylon) recognized the taxonomic differences between several varieties of Cymbopogon nardus and raised a separate population of the variety 'Maha Pengiri' now called C. winterianus. Upon its extensive cultivation for oil in Indonesia, it acquired the commercial name, Java Citronella.

Some of you may have memories of warm evenings in late summer – including mosquitoes and ubiquitous Citronella candles or torches. Unfortunately, that smell memory is most likely influenced by inexpensive and widely available isolates and aroma chemicals used in such products. The fragrance of real Citronella essential oil builds on the crispness of aldehydes with notes of limonene, rosy alcohols and fruity esters – truly an oil worth revisiting.

1 Rose, Jeanne. 375 Essential Oils and Hydrosols, 1999, p. 97.

2 Fischer-Rizzi, Suzanne. Complete Aromatherapy Handbook , 1990, p. 151.

3 Rhind, William. A History of the Vegetable Kingdom, 1868, p. 560.

4 Arctander, Steffen. Perfume and Flavor Materials of Natural Origin, 1960, p. 169.

5 Lawless, Alec. Artisan Perfumery or Being Led by the Nose, 2009, p. 70.

6 Tisserand, Robert and Rodney Young. Essential Oil Safety, 2nd ed., 2014, p. 250.

Blends Well With

No review yet

0%
0
0%
0
0%
0
0%
0
0%
0
You need to be logged in to submit a review
logo

2024-06-14

Organic Rules and the Effect on Shipping Times

Recently, the rules around organic certification were enhanced to prevent fraudulent activity along the supply chain. This is a good thing, though lately you may have noticed...

logo

2024-06-10

How to Increase the Longevity of Natural Perfume

Natural perfumes can offer a beautiful botanical alternative to those typically seen in the mainstream beauty world, though natural aromatics aren’t known for their fragrance longevity. This is because conventional perfumes contain...

logo

2024-03-14

DIY Calendula Recipes

Calendula is a charming and vigorous garden plant with bright, toothy orange and yellow blooms. Its name comes from the root word for “calendar,” well-known for its robust ability to thrive...