Oregano - Organic EO

Origanum vulgare L.

(0)

Our very potent organic Oregano has an amazingly fresh, warm and vibrant aroma with a pungent, spicy-herbaceous, mildly woody undertone. This is a very energetic and powerful oil! Origanum vulgare is a rustic variant of Marjoram (Origanum majorana) that grows wild all over Europe and Asia;

Size

Selected size SKU:727-016 - Oregano - Organic 15 ml (1/2 oz) (w/ orifice reducer)

Sample 1 ml (1/30 oz)
$2.00
15 ml (1/2 oz)
$11.25
30 ml (1 oz)
$19.50
59.14 ml (2 oz)
$32.75
118.29 ml (4 oz)
$60.25
236.58 ml (8 oz)
$104.00
473.17 ml (16 oz)
$183.75
1 kg (2 1/5 lb)
$372.50
$2.00
Details
Solubility & Blending Suggestions
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Certificates of Analysis (COA)
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Product Overview

Our very potent organic Oregano has an amazingly fresh, warm and vibrant aroma with a pungent, spicy-herbaceous, mildly woody undertone. This is a very energetic and powerful oil! Origanum vulgare is a rustic variant of Marjoram (Origanum majorana) that grows wild all over Europe and Asia; however, substantial amounts of Oregano essential oil come only from the Mediterranean varieties.[1]

Plants in the botanical family Labiatae – including Oregano, Lavender, Rosemary, Sage and Thyme – have a special predilection for dry rocky slopes, open spaces, and sunny mountains, preferring the median climatic regions around the Mediterranean Sea.[2] 

The name Oregano comes from the Greek óros, mount and gános, delight or splendor – splendor of the mountains.[3] Its dominant molecule is carvacrol, a monoterpene phenol, thus care must be taken when used in topical applications as there is a risk of dermal and mucous membrane irritation.[4] In general, Oregano oil should be limited to short term use, according to French Aromatherapy literature.[5] Oregano oil is suitable for diffusers, and when used prudently and properly diluted, in foot lotions and targeted topical preparations.

1 Lavabre, Marcel. Aromatherapy Workbook (revised edition), 1997, p. 87.

2 Ibid, pp. 82-3.

3 Industry communication.

4 Tisserand, Robert and Rodney Young. Essential Oil Safety, 2nd ed., 2014, p. 376.

5 Schnaubelt, Kurt. Advanced Aromatherapy The Science of Essential Oil Therapy, 1998, p. 83.

6 Arctander, Steffen. Perfume and Flavor Materials of Natural Origin, 1960, pp. 493-4.

7 Tisserand, Robert and Rodney Young. Essential Oil Safety, 2nd ed., 2014, p. 376.

8 Ibid.

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